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College of Arts and Sciences Courses

ANTH 212 Introduction to Historical Archeology 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
An introductory course in the archeology of historical period sites. The historical period refers to that portion of human history that begins with the appearance of written documents and continues to contemporary societies. This course will discuss the developments, research strategies and future goals of historical archeology. Archaeological examples will come from all populated continents, especially Kuwait, potentially through local field trips.

ARAB 101 Reading in Arabic Literature 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Examines a selection of Arabic writings, leters, peoms, stories, plays, novels and essays from pre-Islamic to cotemporary periods. Selections will be discussed and analyzed. The objective of this course is to cultivate appreciation of Arabic literary heritage and to build awareness of Arabic cultural values, history and society.

ARAB 103 Arabic Functional Writing 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Improves students' written and oral communication skills drawing on non-traditional approaches. It also develops grammatical concepts and their applications in writing. The course is conducted in Arabic.

ARAB 111 Arabic Andalusian Literature 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Covers aspects of cultural, social and political life of Arabic Andalusla (between the 8th century to 15th century). The course will examine this era writers and literary tendencies, in addition to the emergence of a genre type, indicating the most prominent writers in each type, including (Al-Muwachih) the most distinctive Anadlusian art of poetry.

ARAB 210 Reading in Modern Kuwaiti Literature & Culture 3.00

Prerequisite: ARAB 101 or ARAB 103
Analyzes selected literary texts from modern Kuwaiti prose, poetry, and theatre in addition to some texts from popular literature (local dialect), covering the period from the Second World War to date. Its overall goal is to improve the understanding of the current Kuwaiti cultural environment, its components, and its relation to national and regional affairs. The course is conducted in Arabic.

ARAB 211 Arabic Heritage: Culture, Society & Literature 3.00

Prerequisite: ARAB 101 or ARAB 103
This course focuses on two major fields within the Arabic heritage: Culture and Society. It studies their characteristics in different approach and different areas as they were illustrated by literary texts. The course also examines the relation between literature as a cultural product and the society in the Arabic heritage.

ARAB 231 Readings in Politics of Kuwait 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Explores the key concepts of Kuwaiti political discourses, its development and its way of dealing with local, regional and international events. The course considers the democratic experience in Kuwait and analyzes its constitution. The course will focus on reading, analyzing and critically commenting on political speeches and the local press.

ART 110 Art in Cultures 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Provides an introduction to the theoretical aspects of the arts including tangible and intangible cultural heritage. Students gain knowledge understanding theories on the notions of art and culture within a global context. Critical and creative thinking skills are developed through the analysis and interpretation of artwork in form of class lecture, discussions, essays, and/or reports on field work at local cultural venues or events.

ART 114 Drawing I 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Introduces the basic skills needed to achieve drawing compositions from observation. Using different drawing media and supports, students are encouraged to observe and explore different ways of representing a three-dimensional subject on the picture plane. Lectures and class critiques provide an opportunity to communicate verbally about art.

ART 119 Painting I 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Introduces students to classical and contemporary painting techniques and concepts, with emphasis on the understanding of their formal language, the fundamentals of artistic expression and the use of color theory. Class critiques of artwork provide an opportunity to communicate verbally about art. Painting assignments will be created with acrylic paint as the primary medium for this class.

ART 214 Drawing II 3.00

Prerequisite: ART 114
Expands on previously learned drawing techniques and materials. Media such as color pencils, pastel ink, and a variety of supports will be used. Concepts and media of drawing in color are introduced and emphasis is placed on the use of drawings as a means of personal self-expression. Class critiques of artwork provide an opportunity to communicate verbally about art.

ART 235 Studies in Modern Art & Architecture 3.00

Prerequisite: ART 110
Provides an introduction to modern and contemporary art and architecture. The course will cover the impact of historical innovations on art and architecture during this time period in different geographical areas, including dramatic changes in visual language and construction styles.

BIOL 103 Environmental Biology 3.00

Prerequisite: (CS Term<1201 or any other program) & (English Level 3 and above)
Examines the organization of natural ecosystem as it relates to the human community. Basic ecological principles are applied to current environmental issues. Among the topics to be examined are past and present uses and abuses of natural resources; environmental ethics and public policy; global environmental problems; human population growth; pollution; waste disposal; habitat loss; species extinction; and strategies for attaining a sustainable earth;

BIOL 105 Human Biology 3.00

Prerequisite: Non-CS student & English level 3 or above
This is an introduction to scientific methods and experimentation studies of life from basic atoms to cellular levels of organization. Emphasis on human biology and its different organs in general educational lecture is followed. This course is designed for non-science major students.

BIOL 110 Biology I 3.00

Prerequisite: CS student & passed ENGL Foundation & BIOL 110L (pre or co-requisite)
This course is survey of selected basic concepts of biological sciences. Topics covered include the scientific method; cell structure and function; biochemistry, fundamentals of genetics and molecular biology; biotechnology, and current issues in biology. This course is designed for science majors and minors and prepares students for upper level biology courses.

BIOL 110L Biology-I Laboratory 1.00

Prerequisite: BIOL 110 coreq
This course provides clear background information and directions for conducting laboratory activities. Students not only learn basic biological information but also gain experience practicing laboratory techniques. It includes basic techniques for handling the organism, experimental design, data collection, interpretation, and scientific writing. Example physiological processes in major organ systems are studied at the chemical, cellular and organ level. This course is designed for science majors and minors and prepares the students for upper level biology laboratory courses.

CHEM 103 Environmental Chemistry 3.00

Prerequisite: (CS Term<1201 or any other program) & (English Level 3 and above)
Introduces chemistry conceptually; focusing on its eminent role in our everyday life, majorly in the environment. Highlights the chemical principles with little emphasis on calculations for non-science major students. Provides essential topics; Molecular Reasons. The chemist's toolbox, Atoms and Elements, Molecules, Compounds, and Chemical Reactions, Energy for Today and Tomorrow, The Air Around Us, The Liquids & Solids Around Us; Especially Water, Acids and Bases.

CHEM 105 Basic Chemistry Principles 3.00

Prerequisite: Non-CS student & English level 3 or above
This course introduces the most elementary principles of chemistry for non-science major students. Describes the central role chemistry plays in our daily life by showing some interesting applications. This course will identify essential concepts first by indicating the importance of chemistry in our lives, explaining atoms, expressing the atomic structures, classifying the chemical bonds, and chemical calculations, emphasizing the properties of gases, liquids, and solids, in addition to summarizing the concepts of acids, bases and reviewing organic chemistry.

CHEM 110 General Chemistry I 3.00

Prerequisite: CS student & passed ENGL Foundation & (CHEM 110L pre or co)
Discover atomic structure and stoichiometry, the reactions in aqueous solutions, thermochemistry and quantum theory, the electrons configuration, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, intermolecular forces, gases, and physical properties of solutions.

CHEM 110L General Chemistry I Laboratory 1.00

Prerequisite: CHEM 110 coreq
The Basic Chemistry Principles Laboratory course will focus on introducing qualitative and quantitative analyses and will enhance the student's technical skills.

CHIN 101 Chinese I 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Focuses on the speaking and understanding of the Chinese language and the acquisition of the fundamentals of Chinese grammar and characters. At the end of the course, the students will obtain the skills of making short conversations in Chinese, reading simple Chinese texts and writing basic Chinese characters. The curriculum also provides a brief introduction to the Chinese culture.

CSC 101 Introduction to Computer Science 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 co-req. CS & MIS students must take before 45 credits.
Introduction to computer science and programming. Topics include information and data representation, hardware, programming methodology, algorithm design, abstract data types, programming language, operating systems, applications and communications.

CSC 102 Application Development for Beginners 3.00

Prerequisite: (ENGL 100 pre or co) . CS & MIS students can take course only before finishing 45 credits.
Introduction to application development. Topics include: basics of problem solving techniques, game programming, mobile applications, and website development.

CSC 122 Introduction to Computer Programming 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098/100/110/112 & CS student
An introductory course to problem solving and computational thinking using computer programming. Topics include: problem solving fundamentals, programming basics, variables and expressions, input/output, control structures, functions, strings and files.

CSC 123 Fundamentals of Web Design 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 coreq
Web design practices using modern technologies. Topics include: Website basic elements, Web page design, creating site content, and launching a web site.

CSC 125 Object Oriented Programming I 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 122
Programming fundamentals from an object oriented design perspective. Topics include: basic procedural concepts, objects, classes, interface, methods, encapsulation, information hiding, and inheritance.

CSC 225 Programming and Data Structures 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 125
Advanced programming techniques using data structures. Topics include recursion, lists, stacks, queues, trees, graphs, and hash tables.

CSC 226 Object Oriented Programing II 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 225 coreq
Object oriented analysis, design, and advanced programming concepts. Topics include: polymorphism, abstract classes, interfaces, exception handling, graphical user interface, and modelling notations.

CSC 230 Digital Systems 4.00

Prerequisite: CSC 125
Introductory course in digital logic and its specification and simulation. Number systems. Binary arithmetic. Boolean algebra. Combinational logic design. Sequential logic design (controllers). Data Path components (e.g. Registers, adders, register files , etc.). Memory components (e.g. RAM, ROM). Register transfer level (RTL) design.

CSC 235 Programming Challenges 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 225
Practicing advanced problem solving techniques: arrays, stacks, queues, strings, sorting, arithmetic, algebra, combinatorics, number theory, backtracking, geometry, graphs algorithms and traversals. Introduction to dynamic programming, preparing students majoring in computer science for international and regional ACM programming contests.

CSC 270 Computer Systems: Architecture and Organization 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 230
Computer architecture and organization. Topics include performance evaluation, instruction, set architecture, data path, control unit, pipelining, memory hierarchy, storage, and other I/O topics.

CSC 271 Computer Systems: Programming 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 270
Introduction to systems programming in Unix/Linux environment. Topics include scripting, libraries, utilities, development tools, piping, binary files, exception handling, command-line arguments, and symbolic debugging.

CSC 275 Advanced Programming with Unix 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 225 as prerequisite or corequisite
Exploration of the Unix operating system, including its tools and utilities for program development, such as makefile, piping and redirection, shell scripts, regular expressions, and symbolic debuggers. In addition, this course explores advanced features of the C programming language, including various file processing, command-line and variable arguments, exception handling, and generic interfacing.

CSC 300 Discrete Structures 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 125 & MATH 140
This course introduces discrete structures. Topics include: basic logic, sets, relations, functions, proof techniques, counting methods, recursion, trees and graphs.

CSC 301 Web Application Development 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 226 & 361 coreq
Introduction to web development. Topics include client/server side scripting, dynamic websites, web services, database connectivity, security, and authentication.

CSC 313 Design and Analysis of Algorithms 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 225 & 300
Design & analysis of recursive and non-recursive algorithms. Topics include asymptotic analysis of algorithm efficiency, algorithm design techniques (e.g. divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy approaches) and their applications to computational problems, and introduction to parallel algorithms.

CSC 325 Concepts of Programming Languages 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 226
Principles of programming language design. Specification of syntax and semantics. Underlying implementation of block structured languages. Dynamic memory allocation for strings, lists and arrays. Imperative versus applicative programming. First order logic and logic programming. Lambda calculus and functional programming languages. Modern programming languages.

CSC 326 Object Oriented Design Patterns 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 226
In-depth study of object-oriented design patterns. Topics include: creational patterns, structural patterns, and behavioral patterns. Pattern's intent, motivation, applicability, participants, collaborations, consequences, and implementations.

CSC 350 Software Engineering 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 226
Introduction to software engineering. Topics include software development life cycle, software processes, requirements engineering, software architecture and design, software testing, software evolution, and software modeling using UML.

CSC 351 Software Requirements & Business Analysis 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 350
Introduction to modern business analysis. Topics include: planning and monitoring, elicitation, requirements, analysis, solution assessment and validation, requirements management and communication, business problems identification, business cases development and plans for achieving effective solutions.

CSC 361 Database Management Systems 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 313 PRE OR CO
Fundamentals of Database Management Systems. Modern database models. Basic database management concepts. Query languages. Relational algebra and relational calculus. Database design through normalization. Development experience in a team environment.

CSC 380 Mobile Application Development 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 226 & CSC 361 coreq
Introduction to native mobile application development. Topics include creating and deploying mobile applications, development approaches, programming languages, frameworks, application architecture, event-driven programming, model-view-controller, user interface and usability.

CSC 399 Internship in Computer Science 3.00

Prerequisite: Junior Standing
Internship in computer science provides students with an opportunity to integrate theory and practice in a work setting. The course helps students to grow professionally and intellectually. It also sharpens their communication and teamwork skills. Enrolled students are required to complete a minimum of 150 working hours at approved organizations.

CSC 404 Introduction to eCommerce 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 361 Pre or co-requisite
Introduction to eCommerce. Topics include electronic data interchange, digital currency, electronic catalogs, telecommunications infrastructure, data warehousing, software agents, storage retrieval, cryptographic techniques, and different levels of security.

CSC 405 User Interface Development 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 226
Introduction to user interface design principles and techniques. Topics include user and task analysis, interaction design, interaction elements and styles, design patterns, visual communication, prototyping, and evaluation of different user interfaces.

CSC 410 Software Testing & Quality Assurance 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 350
Techniques for software validation and verification. Topics include: concepts of software quality (metrics, assurance, planning & implementation, process standards, validation, verification, reviews, walkthroughs and inspections). Software testing process and techniques at different levels. Validating test data.

CSC 420 Software Maintenance & Re-engineering 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 350
Introduction to software maintenance and re-engineering. Topics include evolution and maintenance models, re-engineering, legacy information systems, impact analysis, refactoring, program comprehension, principles of reuse and reverse engineering, approaches, and tools used to extract information from existing software systems.

CSC 428 Program Translation Techniques 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 226 & 270
Principles and techniques for designing and implementing a compiler. Topics include lexical analysis, parsing techniques, syntax-directed translation, intermediate languages, and code generation.

CSC 430 Artificial Intelligence 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 313
Survey of artificial intelligence techniques. Topics include search, logic, knowledge representation, reasoning with uncertainty, learning, and other AI techniques.

CSC 444 Digital Image Processing 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 226 & MATH 140 & 221
Introduction to digital image processing. Topics include Digital image fundamentals, intensity transformations, and spatial filtering, filtering in frequency domain, Image restoration and reconstruction, Color image processing, Image compression, and Image segmentation.

CSC 451 Capstone Project 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 350 & CSC 361 & PHIL 245
The senior capstone course provides computer science students the opportunity to employ knowledge gained from courses throughout the curriculum to develop a software solution to a real-world problem from conception to completion. Students work in teams to develop software applications. Advanced methods related to requirements analysis, software design, project management, documentation and testing, programming techniques, and database designs will be applied on an incremental basis since the emphasis is on semester-long capstone team projects.

CSC 456 Software Development Processes 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 350 or CSC 452
This course is an in-depth study of software development processes in the context of an actual project. Discussion includes object-oriented processes, such as Rational Unified Process, as well as process management issues such as scheduling, risk-assessment, various metrics, and the selection of appropriate development methodology and tools.

CSC 473 Computer Networks & Communications 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 313 & MATH 221
Introduction to computer communications networks. Topics include circuit-switching, packet switching, TCP/IP model layers, and wireless networks.

CSC 476 Operating Systems 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 270 & 313
Design & implementation of operating systems. Topics include basic operating system structure, process and thread management, deadlocks, memory management, file management, input / output management, and distributed systems.

CSC 477 Security in Computing 3.00

Prerequisite: Senior Standing
Introduction to computer security and privacy. Topics include security in programs, operating systems, networks and databases.

CSC 489 Topics in Computer Science 3.00

Prerequisite: Senior Standing
Topics in Computer Science

CSC 490 Introduction to Academic Research in CSC 3.00

Prerequisite: Senior Standing
This course introduces students to the world of academic research. Students select a field of Computer Science (relevant to one of the faculty member’s background) that interests them most, such as networks, artificial intelligence, software engineering, databases, or another area. Students will conduct a survey of related work, investigate certain theories, produce and analyze results, and submit a written document under the supervision of a faculty member. At the end of the semester, students are expected to present their work to the department’s academic committee, and, optionally, to the public.

CSC 492 Practicum in Computer Science 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 473 coreq & 361 coreq
Practicum in Computer Science prepares students for successful computing related careers. The course aims to train and certify the students with market demanding fields such as computer networks, database systems, computer system/ applications, business and leadership etc.

EDU 259 Introduction to Learners & Learning (non-education majors) 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112 & (Literature/Linguistics students only)
Overview course focusing of the development of infants, children and adolescents focusing on the role of appropriate home and educational environments in fostering positive physical, cognitive, social and moral outcomes. Emphasis will also be placed on developing an understanding of the learning process in an effort to facilitate the development of independent learners. Reading relevant research will be combined with technology based assignments to investigate both biological and sociocultural forces that shape the development process.

EDU 260 Introduction to Special Education 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112
Provides students with information regarding the characteristics of persons with various disabilities included in IDEA. Students will learn the historical and legal issues regarding special education; as well as the methods used to identify, plan and implement instructional strategies to help disabled students.

EDU 261 Introduction to Education Leadership 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112 & Education Major
Outlines the historic, theoretical, and practical viewpoints on leadership and follower-ship, different theories of leadership, management aspects of leadership, vision building, professional ethics, working with groups, educational program, development, and the political, social, cultural and legal aspects related to educational leadership.

EDU 262 Universal Human Rights: Ideals & Realities 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Aims to defend the position that human rights are universal rights by unpacking the concept of universal human rights: its historical beginnings, its possible religious and cultural influences and conflicts, and the ongoing contentions that surround it. Addresses ongoing local, regional, and global rights issues and violations and discusses the transformative power of education for human rights. This course equips students with the knowledge, skills and values necessary to contribute to the worldwide human rights dialogue.

EDU 350 Research in Curriculum and Teacher Education 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112 & Junior Standing
Provides education students with a basic understanding of how to conceptualize, design and interpret research. Students learn how to read, interpret and critique research from different paradigms; formulate meaningful research questions; evaluate and conduct a literature review; and conceptualize a study.

EDU 351 Introduction to Teaching 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 120 & 205 & English Major
This course will explore the multiple roles and functions of professional teaching including: communication, leadership, management skills, use of technology, and identification of needs of diverse populations. Portfolio preparation will be introduced. A minimum of 20 HOURS of observation in school is required.

EDU 352 Introduction to Schools 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 120 & 205 & English Major
This course is one of three introductory, prerequisite courses to the Teacher Education program. An examination of selected concepts and principles underlying public education will be covered. A minimum of 20 hours of observation in schools is required.

EDU 353 Introduction to Learners and Learning 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 120 & 205 & English Major
Foundational study of the development of infants, children and adolescents focusing on the role of appropriate educational environments in fostering positive physical, cognitive, social and moral outcomes. Reading relevant research will be combined with experiences in the field and technology-based assignments to investigate both biological and socio-cultural forces that shape the development process. A minimum of 10 field experience hours required.

EDU 354 Historical & Philosophical Foundations of Education 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 120 & 205 & English Major
Investigation into the history, philosophies, and purposes of education, with an emphasis on the roles of public schools, the role of the teacher as a change agent, the influence of technology on today’s classrooms, and both western and non-western educational practices and traditions.

EDU 355 Introduction to Instructional Methods 3.00

Prerequisite: EDU 351 & 352 & 353 & 354
Beginning methods course for secondary teachers. This course will cover skill development in planning instruction, selecting content, use of various teaching methods, designing assessment, developing classroom climate and management strategies. The course includes participation in professional development through observing students in a school setting, microteaching, using educational technology and portfolio development. A minimum of 12 field experience hours required.

EDU 356 The Psychology of Teaching and Learning 3.00

Prerequisite: EDU 351 & 352 & 353 & 354
This course includes application of the principles of psychology to an understanding of the dynamics of teaching behavior and learning behavior. Course material also involves both theoretical and practical approaches to analysis of the learning environment of the school. This course is required of all who are preparing to teach.

EDU 357 Teaching Reading in Secondary School Content Areas 3.00

Prerequisite: EDU 351 & 352 & 353 & 354
This course will cover methods and materials for improving reading and study strategies in content area classes in secondary school. A minimum of 20 hours of observation in schools is required.

EDU 358 Writing for Teachers 3.00

Prerequisite: EDU 351 & 352 & 353 & 354
Covers techniques for teaching writing to both native speakers of English and EFL learners and includes all aspects of the teaching processing; readings in current theory and research on writing and the implications for teachers. Guides and assists in maturing the writing skills of future teachers. A minimum of 20 hours of observation in school is required.

EDU 451 Classroom Assessment 3.00

Prerequisite: EDU 355 & 356 & 357 & 358
Introduces methods of evaluation in the classrooms, including traditional testing, performance assessment, and task based assessment. Includes discussion of test development, construct validity, reliability and practicality. A minimum of 20 hours of observation in schools is required.

EDU 452 Instructional Materials Development 3.00

Prerequisite: EDU 355 & 356 & 357 & 358
This is a level 2 teacher education course that presents criteria to use in selection of instructional materials (cultural appropriateness, coverage of required content, presentation of content, and practically) and introduces development of classrooms materials to supplement the course textbook. Supplementary materials would include teacher-made worksheets, work cards, overhead projector transparencies, posters, pictures and games.

EDU 453 Technology Assisted Learning 3.00

Prerequisite: EDU 355 & 356 & 357 & 358
Introduces how language learning classrooms can benefit from the use of computer technology and language learning software, including writing instructions enhanced through word processing in the classrooms; interactive software programs to supplement instructions in vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation, and pragmatics; computerized assessment, internet-based information searching; and presentation software.

EDU 454 Classroom Management 3.00

Prerequisite: EDU 355 & 356 & 357 & 358
Focuses on the classroom management skills required for student teachers to achieve and maintain discipline in the classroom. Includes lesson planning, organization and pacing, choice of appropriate instructional methodology, classroom interaction and student motivation. A minimum of 20 hours of observation in schools is required.

EDU 455 The Curriculum and Methods of Teaching English 3.00

Prerequisite: EDU 355 & 356 & 357 & 358
Examines the scope and sequence of English courses in the school curriculum with emphasis on the selection and organization of materials and methods of instruction and evaluation. Prepares students for student teaching by providing in depth study of the English curriculum used in the State of Kuwait. Course includes 15 hours of peer tutoring in the GUST FPU and 15 hours of observation in the GUST FPU as assigned by instructor. Taken prior to student teaching and concurrently with EDU 451, 452, 453 & 454.

EDU 457 Secondary School Student Teaching 12.00

Prerequisite: EDU 451 & 452 & 453 & 454 & 455
Clinical teaching experience in secondary school classrooms under university and school supervision. To be taken after appropriate curriculum and methods courses.

EDU 458 Student Teaching Seminar 2.00

Prerequisite: EDU 457 coreq
Explores educational philosophy, teaching strategies, and instructional technology in the classroom setting. Seminar topics include classroom environment, teaching strategies, classroom management, assessment, and professional development.

ENGL 095 English as a Foreign Level - Basic Level 0.00

This course provides students with the beginning-level reading, composition, grammar, speaking and listening skills necessary to advance to English 097. Students develop these skills through practice in the classroom and in the CALL laboratory. Reading targets the cognitive skills of sequencing, generalizing, synthesizing, summarizing, and making inferences and judgments about information. Skimming, scanning, using context clues and predicting are introduced. Students focus on writing grammatically correct sentences. Listening and speaking skills are developed through speaking and listening assignments. Academic vocabulary is developed through reading and listening as well as memorizing and using assigned vocabulary. Students earn a grade of P (pass) or NP (not pass).

ENGL 097 English as Second Language, Level 1 0.00

Prerequisite: Based on TOEFL, GEPT
This course provides students with the high-beginning level reading, composition, grammar, speaking and listening skills necessary to advance to English 098. Reading targets the cognitive skills of sequencing, generalizing, synthesizing, summarizing, and making inferences and judgments about information. Skimming, scanning, using context clues and predicting are introduced. Students are encouraged to envision writing as a process whereby they organize, compose, draft, revise and edit written work. Students are familiarized with different rhetorical patterns through completing various writing assignments with emphasis on the content, structure, and grammar of their written work. Listening and speaking skills are developed through note taking and speaking and listening assignments. Academic vocabulary is developed through reading and listening as well as memorizing and using assigned vocabulary. Students earn a grade of P (pass) or NP (not pass).

ENGL 098 English as Second Language - Level 2 0.00

Prerequisite: Eng 097 or based on placement test score
This course is for students with high intermediate English language proficiency and focuses on developing and refining the receptive and productive language skills necessary for success in the academic environment. Utilizing the lecture method, group workshop activities, and individual student-instructor interaction, the student will analyze and evaluate academically-oriented texts to enhance reading, listening, writing, note-taking and speaking skills and to produce formal essays and presentations that demonstrate readiness for university credit courses. In both in and out-of-class activities, the student will practice appropriately summarizing, paraphrasing and synthesizing information and ideas from college-level materials while at the same extending vocabulary, sentence, and communication skills, Exit exam required. Credit earned cannot be used for graduation.

ENGL 100 Academic English I 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 098
This course serves as a bridge between the GUST’s program of English as a Foreign Language and its Freshman Composition 110. Similar to ENG 110, it carries academic credit. As a bridge, it facilitates the students’ entry into full university life by developing their high-intermediate level writing, reading, research, citation, and critical thinking skills to the level required in GUST degree courses.

ENGL 101 Academic Success 3.00

Prerequisite: (ENGL 098 | 100) & Level=Freshman & GPA<2
This course focuses on perparing the student to be successful in a higher-education environment, specifically the Gulf University for Science & Technology environment. Through a combination of brief lectures, followed by pair/group work, and indvidual reflection activities, as well as through on-campus investigative activities, the student will be presented with real-university-life concepts and situations and then assigned tasks requiring application and exercise of critical-thinking and problem solving skills. Under the close supervision of the instructor and using the workshop method in tandem with current blended learning practices, the student will investigate issues, concepts and skills that provide a solid foundation for smooth integration into university life. Capstone project is required. Successful completion of this course will prepare students for sommoth entry into the world of higher education and will counter behaviours that have set them on a non-productive path.

ENGL 101 Academic Success 3.00

Prerequisite: (ENGL 098 | 100) & Level=Freshman & GPA<2
This course focuses on perparing the student to be successful in a higher-education environment, specifically the Gulf University for Science & Technology environment. Through a combination of brief lectures, followed by pair/group work, and indvidual reflection activities, as well as through on-campus investigative activities, the student will be presented with real-university-life concepts and situations and then assigned tasks requiring application and exercise of critical-thinking and problem solving skills. Under the close supervision of the instructor and using the workshop method in tandem with current blended learning practices, the student will investigate issues, concepts and skills that provide a solid foundation for smooth integration into university life. Capstone project is required. Successful completion of this course will prepare students for sommoth entry into the world of higher education and will counter behaviours that have set them on a non-productive path.

ENGL 103 Academic Literacy 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 098
Covers principles of learning strategies including academic task such as problem-solving; note-taking; following directions; reading, organizing, and summarizing information for study purposes; interpreting graphs; test taking; using the library, basic computer/technology skills and any other skill modules determined necessary by the FPU and English Department joint committee.

ENGL 110 English Composition I 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 100
This course teaches critical reading and thinking skills and emphasizes writing as a process. Students analyze a broad and challenging range of nonfiction prose selections, deepening their awareness of rhetoric and how language works. Through close reading and frequent writing, students develop their ability to work with language and text with a greater awareness of purpose and strategy. Students write three documented research papers and enrich their vocabulary through their critical reading. Because of the demanding curriculum, students must bring to the course sufficient command of mechanical conventions and an ability to read and discuss prose.

ENGL 112 English Composition II 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Focuses on the development of active reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing. Students develop their academic writing skills by identifying and fulfilling the requirements of supporting an academic thesis. Students address issues of grammar and mechanics within the context of their writing.

ENGL 120 Introduction to Literature 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112 coreq & English Major only
Introduction to Literature

ENGL 121 Words and Structures 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112
Enhances vocabulary, grammar, and writing skills necessary for language educators. Allows students to develop practical skills in English word formation (morphology) and sentence structure (syntax) analysis. Gives an opportunity to apply vocabulary and grammar skills to text analysis and text composition.

ENGL 200 Advanced Expository Writing 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112
This course will develop the student’s style and critical analytical abilities in contemporary American English writing. The course will also offer an introduction to formal research and documentation methods for preparing papers in a variety of fields. Additional emphasis will be placed on improving the student’s reading abilities, both in comprehension and vocabulary. Course satisfies the junior-level communicative skills requirement. This course may not be taken with the satisfactory/unsatisfactory option.

ENGL 201 Business Writing 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112
Provides students with communication skills necessary to pursue career goals. Introduces students to key business documents utilized in today's global marketplace. Helps students compose various business documents including memos, emails, letters, CVs, job application letters, and formal reports. Assists students to engage in and demonstrate critical thinking skills such as analyzing, evaluating, constructing and supporting an argument to produce business documents.

ENGL 203 Traditional Grammar 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 110 coreq & English Major
Presents an introduction to the terms and concepts of traditional grammar, beginning with the parts of speech and moving to more complex structures such as phrases, clauses and sentences. Complex structures are made up from words in regular ways, and it is possible to describe the regularities involved by giving general statements or rules that hold for all the sentences in the language.

ENGL 205 Introduction to Linguistics 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112 coreq & 203 coreq & English Major
A survey of linguistics with emphasis on what the field reveals about the English language. Topics include the sounds of language, grammar, writing systems, language acquisition, language in society, language history, dialects, and usage.

ENGL 207 Introduction to Translation 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 205
Introduces an overview of the field of translation studies. Familiarizes students with the key terminology within the field while offering them analytical tools that assist them in understanding the process of translation. Focuses on the basic linguistic and cultural challenges in translation from a source language to a target language.Emphasizes practical issues involved in translation process.

ENGL 208 Advanced Business Communications 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112 & non-English majors
Emphasizes the use of digital technology and rhetorical strategies to facilitate effective professional communication in international business settings. In this course students will work in pairs or small group on projects that simulate realistic international business communication scenarios. In these projects students will practice and master the skills necessary for digital personal branding, working in teams, delivering professional presentations, and interacting with customers and business partners.

ENGL 209 Translation Across Professions 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 207
Covers topics of professional interest in translation in various areas of specialization such as legal, commercial, technical, scientific and audio visual translation. Topics include translation for the government, translation for business, translation for multimedia and digital humanities. Discusses translation ethics. Exposes students to the basics of computer-aided translation.

ENGL 212 Arabic Grammar for Translators 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 203
In the process of translation, it is very important for the translator to master grammar in both the source language and the target one. Therefore, this course is designed to concentrate upon the elements of grammatical mastery in the Arabic language. A course in Arabic grammar should enable the student to produce grammatically correct and intelligible sentences in Arabic when translating a text from English into Arabic. This course is a key to understanding many textual features of the Arabic language.

ENGL 214 Strategic Writing 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112
Draws on rhetorical theory to teach the critical skills and practical reasons for evaluating audiences, structuring an argument, and applying stylistic techniques to improve the persuasive appeal of your messages. Students will learn strategies to acheive specific communication goals in writing standard strategic messages and documents for internal and external audiences. They will get practice in writing web and e-mail messages, memos, business letters, letters to the editor, fundraising letters, press releases, brochures, and feature stories.

ENGL 214 Strategic Writing 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112
Draws on rhetorical theory to teach the critical skills and practical reasons for evaluating audiences, structuring an argument, and applying stylistic techniques to improve the persuasive appeal of your messages. Students will learn strategies to acheive specific communication goals in writing standard strategic messages and documents for internal and external audiences. They will get practice in writing web and e-mail messages, memos, business letters, letters to the editor, fundraising letters, press releases, brochures, and feature stories.

ENGL 222 American Literature I 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 120
Representative selections from American authors from the middle of the Seventeenth century to the middle of the Nineteenth century.

ENGL 223 American Literature II 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 222
Examines representative selections from American authors from the middle of the Seventeenth century to the middle of Nineteenth century.

ENGL 224 English Literature I 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 120
The development of English literature from the Middle Ages through the Eighteenth century. Reading and analysis of representative works of selected major writers.

ENGL 225 English Literature II 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 224
Examines the development of English literature during the Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries. Reading and analysis of representative works of selected major writers.

ENGL 271 Short Story Writing 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112
An introductory approach to the craft of fiction writing (the short story, mainly) the course will focus on writing exercise in the beginning and then short stories, work-shopping them in class with particular attention to character, point of view, plot, setting, description, tone, narrative orchestration, meaning, style and language - in addition to whatever else arises regarding the writing and reading of short stories. Copies of short stories and essays on the craft of fiction will be handed out, in addition to what will be read and discussed in texts. The instructor will discuss collection of stories and novels all serious and beginning writers should read. Responses - written and spoken - to stories are expected. Students are to be considerate of everyone's writing, and to bear in mind that all writers write badly at times. The purpose of a fiction workshop such as this is to improve our fiction writing and to continue learning what we can about the art of narrative creation.

ENGL 272 Languages of the World 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 203
Introduces the student to the concepts of langauge, dialect, and linguistic diversity. Presents geographical and historical survey of the world's languages, focussing on the ways in which languages can differ from one another. Explains language endangerment, language extinction, and the threat to lingustic diversity it poses. Requires that students investigate one of the world's lesser known languages and report on its status with respect to issues discussed in class.

ENGL 299 Introduction to Research Methods 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 205
Introduces the scientific method in language studies and quantitative/ qualitative research methods. Familiarizes students with data collection techniques and basic data analysis using MS-Excel.

ENGL 300 History of the English Language 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 203
This course provides a historical survey of the English language from its Indo-European roots through Old and Middle English to the present. Topics include changes in sound, meaning, and grammar, as well as developments in American English, including regional and social dialects.

ENGL 302 Phonetics & Phonology 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 205
This course introduces students to the science of sounds in the English Language. Its main objective is to improve our students’ pronunciation; therefore, emphasis is put upon the two main varieties of the English language, British English and American English. The main aspects of English phonology are also covered in this course to explain the relationship between pronunciation and meaning. The communicative value of intonation is also studied to show the students the importance of this feature in conveying extra linguistic meanings.

ENGL 310 Translation Theory & Practice 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 205 & ENGL 212
This is a course in the theory of translation. The student is introduced to the various theories in the field and the way to apply them in translation. Attention is paid to the background of every studied theory to understand its application.

ENGL 311 Morphology 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 205
This course introduces students to the study of lexicon as seen from the viewpoint of modern theories of grammar, such as Extended Standard theory and Transformational theory. This course acquaints the students with the formation of English words and the logic behind their formation and usage. The theoretical framework is kept to the minimum because the aim of this course is to enrich the student’s lexical background rather than to study the formalization of lexis.

ENGL 312 English / Arabic Translation 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 212 & ENGL 310 & (ENGL 314 pre or co-requisite)
Introduces students to English texts from different registers. Provides students with textual differences between English and Arabic to enable them to analyze texts while translating. Helps students understand various textual repertoires, which is another main objective of this course. Enhances student's skills that are required to compare and contrast the structure of both English and Arabic respectively in order to make them aware of the linguistic, cultural, and communicative differences while translating.

ENGL 313 Syntax 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 205
This course teaches a study of modern English grammar from the perspectives of traditional, structural, and transformational grammar.

ENGL 314 Arabic-English Translation 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 212 & ENGL 310 &(ENGL 312 pre or co-requisite)
This course is complementary to English-Arabic Translation. In this course, the student is introduced to Arabic texts from various registers to compare and contrast them with their English counterparts. A properly translated text should partake of common elements from the source text and the target one. Thus, the emphasis here is based upon translating by understanding the textual differences between the source and the target texts.

ENGL 316 An Introduction To Text Studies 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 205
An Introduction To Text Studies is an advanced course in Linguisticss in which major issues of textual features, structures and patterns are studied. Text analysis is viewed through the prism of systemic linguistics in which scale and category textual features are analyzed. Written texts are seen as interactive entities that require active interactants. The purpose and the process of creating texts are closely studied in this course.

ENGL 320 Rhetoric 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 205
Rhetoric is the art of persuasion. It is also the study of discourse to inform or to motivate audiences. This course is an introduction to classical rhetoric and its main premises and postulates. Oration is also focused upon here as a rhetorical art that uses logical premises to persuade or dissuade audiences

ENGL 321 Myth 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 222/ 224
Myth

ENGL 350 Translation for Business and Commerce 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 207
This course aims to introduce students to the practice of translation for business and commerce. This subject establishes a theoretical framework for business translation and offers extensive practice in translating materials in business and commerce. The purpose of this course is to enable learners to gain insights into business translation at undergraduate level.

ENGL 360 Practical Criticism (Writing about Literature) 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 222/ 224
The course acquaints students with the techniques and terminology of literary criticism and trains them in the rudiments of writing about literature. Students compose 8-10 practical, critical essays on drama, poetry, fiction, and non-fictional prose. Explication of particular texts is emphasized. A longer critical paper incorporating secondary sources and introducing students to basic methods and resources for research is assigned. The course is required of English majors but is open to all qualified students.

ENGL 361 Translation for the Media 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 207
This course aims to introduce students to the practice of translation for the media. This subject establishes a theoretical framework for media translation and offers extensive practice in translating materials in a wide range of media. The purpose of this subject is to enable learners to gain insights into media translation at undergraduate level.

ENGL 370 Translation for Science & Technology 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 207
This course aims to introduce students to the practice of translation for science and technology. It establishes a theoretical framework for translating scientific and technological idioms and expressions and offers extensive practice in translating materials in a wide range of texts. The purpose of this subject is to enable learners to gain insights into science and technology translation at undergraduate level.

ENGL 371 Adolescent Literature 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 120
Explores the common themes in YA literature including multiculturalism, identity, gender, and disability. Surveys excerpts of 'new classics' and examines the literary trends associated with them. Emphasizes critical reading as part of the exploration of YA literature in which we explore the politics at hands in each of these texts. Focuses on how we can as educators use young adult literature to develop and enhance critical reading/ thinking skills.

ENGL 372 Children's Literature 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 120
Surveys a broad range of children's literature and its cultural contexts. Aims to teach students to identify literary elements and understand the history and development of children's literature and key issues today. Focuses on the important role children's literature plays in elementary literacy instruction.

ENGL 377 Special Topics in Literature I 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 222 OR ENGL 224
This course introduces students to world literature from Antiquity to the beginings of the Modern period. Texts, which can be written in English or translated into English, are drawn from non-Anglophone regions of the world--particularly the Arab world, as well as Africa, Asia, Latin America, continental Europe and Russia--one or two samples from each region. They cover the conventions, forms, and styles of the genres: poetry, drama, novel, essay and film. The focus may shift from the historical and genealogical to the generic and ideational, so that either a survey approach or a thematic one will take precedence at any one time.

ENGL 380 Translation for Legal work 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 207
This course aims to introduce students to the practice of legal translation. This subject establishes a theoretical framework for legal translation and offers extensive practice in translating key documents in a wide range of legal fields. The purpose of this subject is to enable students to gain insights into legal translation at the undergraduate level.

ENGL 409 Special Topics in Translation 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 312 & ENGL 314
Approaches translation as a wider extra-textual phenomenon that considers cultural encounters as acts of translation. Introduces functionalist, cultural approaches to translation and the critical methods of cultural studies. Covers major historical processes including orientalism, colonialism, post-colonialism, and globalization. Focuses on issues of identity, gender, representation and authenticity of source cultures, and cultural appropriation by the target culture. Requires competency of both Arabic and English to read, analyze, and translate key texts in travel writing.

ENGL 410 Semantics 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 205
The crux of this course is the study of meaning. Interlocutors and writers use language to communicate meaning; therefore, they use certain logical structures to constitute their meanings. The study of true or false state of sentences lies under Semantics. This course is a twin course to Syntax, where the rules of combining sentences are studied. The student is introduced to rules of forming sentences from a lexico­grammatical point of view. The framework adopted is based upon Chomsky’s transformational theory.

ENGL 411 Pragmatics 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 205
In this course, the student is introduced to the process of making meaning and the possibility of communication in the English language. Meaning in use is the crux of this course, where the student studies meaning not from a strictly semantico­logical point of view, but rather from a strictly contextual viewpoint. Semantics is formal; Pragmatics is functional and ideational; based on this principle, the course is designed to pinpoint the contextual aspects that can affect the formation of meaning. Speech act theory, politeness theory, and relevance theory are accentuated in this course.

ENGL 412 Applied Linguistics 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 205
This course investigates the application of the outcomes of linguistic theory upon the many social practices involving language understanding. Texts, discourses, and pedagogy are only a few areas in which Linguistics can be applied, shedding light on the efficacy of applying highly abstract theoretical notions to social practices. Mediating between theory and practice can definitely help the translator to solve many problems, especially textual equivalencies between a source text and a target one.

ENGL 413 Discourse Analysis 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 205
This course investigates the correlation between form and function in English. As text is a passage in discourse, one should study the latter from a macro perspective to observe the discursive manipulative strategies that affect interlocutors’ linguistic choices. The framework of study is based on Critical Discourse analysis, as advocated by Norman Fairclough and Teun Van Dijk.

ENGL 414 Translation Project 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 314 and Senior Standing (passed 84 credits)
Helps students to work closely with his/her instructor on the production of an extended translation related topic of the student's own choice. Assists students to improve their expertise in examining texts and analyzing the academic, theoretical, linguistic, and socio-cultural issues underlying communication across cultures. Enhances student's ability to conduct professional translation both in English and Arabic texts. Helps students conduct an advanced project in translating texts from English into Arabic and vice versa.

ENGL 415 Language in Society 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 300 / 205
Examines the ways in which relationships and structures in society influence language and vice versa. Explores variations in language that are determined by region, gender, socio-economic level, and cultural background. Introduces major sociolinguistic theories. Explores methods of analyzing language issues in the students' own lives to help them establish positions in the light of findings of sociolinguistic research

ENGL 420 Interactional Pragmatics 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 205
The purpose of this course is to prepare students for interacting in a university context, using academic presentations, discussions, argumentation, formal and informal role-plays, and interviews. This course also emphasizes kinesics, eye-gaze and proximity in human interaction. Systematics of conversation and conversational routines, paralinguistic factors, spatial organization in social encounters and behavioral foundations for the process of frame attunement are some of the topics covered in this course

ENGL 421 Psycholinguistics 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 205
Introduces basic theories and findings in the study of the psychological process of language use, with a focus on the comprehension, production, acquisition, and representation of the language. Psycholinguistics is an area of specialization in cognitive psychology that focuses on the psychological components of the langauge processor. This course emphasizes the commonalities that underline human language everywhere, and we will focus on what these commonalities tell us about the basic nature of the human language capacity.

ENGL 429 Classical Literature 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 222/ 224
Provides student with a broad overview of classical literature as it bears on English literature. Also aims to acquaint students with the cultural, religious, political background of the Greek and Roman worlds by perusing a broad range of texts. Examines classical texts by different authors, such as Homer, Sophocles, Aristophanes, Virgil and Horace, in order for students to be exposed to a wide selection of perspectives, rationales and contexts.

ENGL 432 Medieval English Literature 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 224
This course is a survey of Old and Middle English literature from Beowulf to Malory’s Morte d’Arthur, exclusive of Chaucer. All works are read in modern English translations.

ENGL 433 Shakespeare: Tragedies & Romances 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 224
The development of Shakespeare’s concept of tragedy and tragicomedy from Titus Andronicus to The Tempest. The plays will be related to the social and literary milieu of the period.

ENGL 434 Shakespeare: Comedies & Histories 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 224
Shakespeare’s early work for the theatre with some attention to the sonnets and longer poems. An historical background for a study of all the plays, including discussions of Elizabethan society, the world of the stage and Shakespeare’s biography.

ENGL 435 Elizabethan Poetry and Prose 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 224
Elizabethan Poetry and Prose

ENGL 436 Drama: The Greatest Hits 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 224
Studies some of history's most famous dramas both as literary forms and as cultural expressions. Students will read and discuss a wide variety of well-known plays from ancient Greece and Rome, the early modern English stage, and explore the global influence of drama.

ENGL 437 Early Seventeenth Century Poetry and Prose 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 225
Covers the poetry and prose of the Caroline, Jacobian, and Restoration eras during which England emerged as a colonial power. Studies texts prior to and post civil war with emphasis on theater. Examines the political, social, demographic, literary, etc. transformation that overtook England, and analyzes puritan as well as secular texts from early and later in the century for authors such as John Donne, John Milton, Andrew Marvell, George Herbert among others.

ENGL 442 Age of Johnson 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 224
Covers the breakdown of the Neo-Classical spirit and the introduction of the 'new' poetry, drama, essay and novel from Thomas Sterne to Sameul Johnson. Attention is paid to the social, cultural and historical contexts of the major works.

ENGL 443 The 18th Century English Novel: Gender & Class 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 224
Explores the factors contributing to the rise of the 18-century novel and discusses in-depth the two central issues in 18th-century fiction - class and gender.

ENGL 444 The 19th Century English Novel 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 225
Novels of the Romantic and Victorian periods, from Austen to George Eliot.

ENGL 445 Early Romantic Poetry and Prose 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 225
Early Romantic Poetry and Prose

ENGL 447 The Gothic 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 224
Explores the factors contributing to the rise of Gothic ism in the 18th century, and discusses Gothic literary aesthetics and cultural politics.

ENGL 448 Literature of the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 225
Literature of the period between 1870 and the First World War, including works by writers such as Hardy, Conrad, James, Wilde, Stevenson, Shaw, Jefferies, and Wells.

ENGL 449 Modern British Fiction 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 225
Critical reading and analysis of British fiction of the twentieth century. There may be some attention to American and continental influences.

ENGL 450 Selected Major American Writers I 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 223
American literature of the nineteenth century: Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Whitman and others.

ENGL 451 Selected Major American Writers II 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 223
American literature of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries: James, Twain, Stephen Crane, Dreiser and others.

ENGL 452 American Fiction to World War I 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 223
Development of the novel and short story in America.

ENGL 453 Modern American Fiction 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 223
The novel and short story in America since World War I. There may be some attention to British and continental influences.

ENGL 454 World Literature 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 222/ 224
Analyzes representative work of world literature, Western and non-Western, from Antiquity to modern times. Highlights certain periods (e.g. from Antiquity to the Renaissance, the 18th century to the late 19th century, or the modern and post modern periods) or certain thematic concerns. Analyzes works in their cultural/ historical contexts and their enduring human values which unite the different literary traditions. Promotes critical thinking and writing within a framework of cultural diversity as well as comparative and interdisciplinary analysis.

ENGL 455 Modern Poetry 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 223 / 225
Moving from the poetry of Yeats, Hardy, Eliot and Pound through Frost, Langston Hughes, Stevens, Williams, Moore, Audent and Plath, to Larkin, Raine, Ted Hughes, Heaney and Ashberry, this course takes in such key modern movements and ideas as Symbolism, Imagism, the Harlen Renaissance, the Beat generation, Confessionalism, Formalism, Martian poetry, Postmodernism, Performance and Slam.

ENGL 456 From Text To Film 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 222/ 224
Introduces students to film theory and issues of cinematic adaptation. Highlights text and film as different mediums, and focuses on the creative transformation that takes place in the process of adapting literary texts. Explores and eclectic selection of literary texts and their cinematic counterparts from different traditions and eras.

ENGL 457 Modern Drama 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 223 / 225
Focuses on plays and ideas that have influenced or modified the direction of drama in the modern period. Representative plays from the 1880s to the present day are analyzed and reviewed in the class, both critically and in performance.

ENGL 460 History of Literary Criticism 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 222/ 224
Historical survey of the principles of literary criticism from Plato to the present.

ENGL 461 Contemporary Critical Theory 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 222/ 224
This course is to acquaint students with a range of critical methodologies that have gained currency since the 1960’s. The kinds of criticism considered include: formalist (New Critical, Russian, and Aristotelian), structuralist, post-structuralist, Marxist, reader response, psycho-sexual, and feminist.

ENGL 470 Forms and Modes of Poetry 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 222/ 224
Forms and Modes of Poetry

ENGL 472 Modern Novel 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 223 / 225
Explores the novels of major twentieth-century Anglophone writers and discusses them from a variety of critical perspectives (Marxist, postcolonial, feminist, psychoanalytic). Emphasises the importance of reading the modern novel in the context of its pertinent literary movements (modernism, postmodernism), as well as in the context of its global, transnational reception.

ENGL 473 Narrative and Cultural Studies 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 224
Introduces theories that have defined cultural studies. Focuses on the dynamics of culture regionally and globally, through interdisciplinary cultural critique and analysis, from literature to other media generally.

ENGL 474 Seminar 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 223 / 225
Since the topics of ENG 4900 may change each semester, the course may be repeated for credit if the topics are substantially different. Enrollment limited to twelve students.

ENGL 476 Studies in Women & Literature 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 223 / 225
The course examines the role of gender in literature, including the transformation of literary genres by women writers, writings by women during a particular historical period, and gender relations in literature. Specific topics vary from semester to semester. The course may be repeated for credit with departmental approval.

ENGL 477 Special Topics in Literature 2 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 223 / 225
Special topics in literature that are not covered in other 4000-level English courses. Since the topics of ENG 4950 may change each semester, the course may be repeated for credit if the topics are substantially different.

ENGL 478 Comparative Literature 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 222/ 224
Explores literature and other forms of cultural expression across linguistic and cultural boundaries. Presents a genrous range of literary works to develop a focused critical understanding of how cultures differ from one another. Focuses on the creative connections between literary texts as intertexts, as well as on the ways of reading and comparing them critically.

ENGL 480 Postcolonial Literature 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 224
Survey post-colonial literature written primarily in English in the twentieth century by authors from around the world, including Britain, America, Asia and Africa. Examines texts in their historical contexts, with due emphasis upon their interrelation.

ENGL 481 Literature in Translation 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 223 / 225
Analyzes various world literatures as they are translated into English. Introduces students to serveral major national literatures and their transnational Anglophone reception. Texts can be selected from Arabic, African, French, Italian, Japanese, Russian, South American, and other traditions.

ENGL 487 Advanced Business and Technical Writing. 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 201
Advanced Business and Technical Writing.

ENGL 495 Special Topics in Writing 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 222/ 224
This course will cover special topics in writing that are not covered in other 4000­level English courses. Since the topics of ENG 495 may change each semester, the course may be repeated for credit if the topics are substantially different.

ENGL 499 Practicum in Linguistics/Translation 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 409
Provides students with opportunities to explore career interests while applying knowledge and skills learned in the classroom in a work settings. Helps students gain a clearer sense of what they still need to learn or how their skills can be improved and provides an opportunity to build professional networks.

ENVR 103 Weather and Climate 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Serves as a general environmental science course for the non-science major. Topics include: atmospheric composition, solar radiation, temperature, moisture and condensation relationship between air pressure and wind, weather patterns, severe weather, optical phenomena in the atmosphere, and the behavior and possible changes of climate, Air Pollution, Climate Changes, Greenhouse Warning.

FREN 101 French I 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Introduces students to the basic principles of the French language such as day to day vocabulary, simple sentences and questions. Content includes oral and writing skills, basic grammar and cultural notions, this course is an introductory course that assumes no previous knowledge of the langauge.

FREN 102 French II 3.00

Prerequisite: FREN 101
Develops in depth the language skills covered in French I and explores more day to day situations. This course is the continuation of French I, students will improve their basic knowledge of the language and achieve an advance beginner level. Emphasis will be placed upon their oral and writing skills.

FREN 122 French and Francophone Culture 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 110 / 112
Focuses on French and Francophone culture. Students will be exposed to French history, geography, politics, literature, art, architect, music and economics. They will also understand the emergence of the Francophone community. The course will acquaint students with the different cultures of the French Speaking countries as well as the role of the French language in shaping this community in all its diversity. Conducted in English.

FREN 270 French Conversation 3.00

Prerequisite: Any FREN course
This course aims to develop student's ability to speak and understand French in both conversational and formal contexts. It focuses on active communication skills while working on spontaneous conversations related to daily life topics. Activities include oral presentations, collaborative projects, language journals and other multimedia documents.

GRMN 101 German I 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Covers basic concepts of the German language, such as present and conversational past tense, word order in statements and questions, and expressing likes and dislikes. The course also explores cultural aspects of the German-speaking countries, such as the school and university system. The goal is to achieve basic fluency in spoken German and competency in the reading and writing of short texts.

GRMN 102 German II 3.00

Prerequisite: GRMN 101
This course is the continuation of German I. We will further explore German speaking cultures in connection with writing, reading, hearing and speaking the German Language, including fundamentals of German pronunciation, grammatical structures, and vocabulary. At the end of the course you be able to understand longer texts, engage in meaningful conversations, and to write essays on cultural topics using the structures and vocabulary you have learned.

GRMN 122 Germany in Europe: A Survey of Culture and Society 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Offers a survey of German history, culture and society, with special emphasis on the developments in Germany since 1945. Focuses on topics such as Germany's political system and the country's position in Europe and the world, reunification and the resulting social problems, immigrant communities, and the Germany economy. Approaches these topics via primary texts as well as films and secondary materials. Also considers literary, philosophical, and the historical texts. Taught in English.

GRMN 380 Readings in German 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Provides students with an overview of German-language literature through a critical study of representative short to medium-length texts in translation. The course complements the German language and culture courses available and also aims to familiarize students with genres and key critical concepts with the German literary tradition. The course is conducted in English.

GSM 481 Selected Topics in Comparative Literature 3.00

Investigates the four topics of wars, the modern city, family and gender, colonial and post-colonial encounters, by considering the literary traditions of the Middle East, the Hispanic America and Europe. Through the analysis of texts, the student will achieve and appreciation of literary imagination and its relationship with other cultural components in our global society.

HIST 103 World History to 1500 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Provides students with a survey of the foundations and development of world civilizations from the prehistoric period to 1500 with emphasis on political, economic, social, and cultural institutions.

HIST 104 World History since 1500 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Surveys, in a global perspective, the most important historical development of the modern era: from the emergence of long-distance trade and joint-stock companies to communist state planning, from the slave trade to colonialism, from the rise of the modern empires to the self-determination of nations, from the World Wars to the Cold War.

HIST 144 History of the Modern Middle East 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Introduces the modern history of the Middle East by covering the period from the early 19th century to the present day. Discusses the political, economic, and social changes that shaped its development. Focuses on the encounter of Middle Eastern societies with the West and the legacy of Ecolonialism, the rise of nationalism, and the role of religion in Middle Eastern countries.

HIST 152 Arabic Islamic Culture & Civilization 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Aims to help students to understand Islam as religion and a civilization will be traced from its Arabian origins to its present position as the major religion of Africa, Asia and the Middle East. Special emphasis will be placed on the Islamic state, Sufi myticism, the Shariah, and the Muslim conflict with modernization.

HIST 225 Colonial and Post-Colonial Africa 3.00

Prerequisite: Any HIST course
Surveys the most important events and themes that define the colonial and post-colonial history of sub-Saharan Africa. some of the events included in this courses are the "scramble" for Africa, the creation and consolidation of the colonial system, the struggle for decolonization and key issues in post-colonial Africa.

HIST 234 Age of Empires 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Surverys the most important empires in modern world history. Compares the early modern expansion of the Ottoman Empire with the rise and fall of the early modern Portugese and Spanish empires. Overviews various imperial models such as the seaborne Dutch Empire, British expansion in India and French colonialism in North Africa

HIST 241 Arab Science & the Scientific Revolution 3.00

Prerequisite: HIST 103
Provides students with a survey of most important achievements obtained by the Arabs in astronomy, mathematics, physics and medicine during the middle ages. It also shows the crucial role played by Arab Science in the formation of a new idea of what is scientific knowledge in the Western World in the pre-modern period.

HIST 255 American History since 1865 3.00

Prerequisite: Any HIST course
Defines and describes the evolution and development of American history from 1865 to the present with emphasis on political, social, and cultural institutions.

HIST 300 Selected topics in History 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 110 & POLI 101
Provides students with insights from various historical events and themes, utilizes theoretical approaches, including theories from political science, to enhance students' analytical skills.

MATH 094 Beginning Contemporary Mathematics 0.00

Prerequisite: This course can be taken by only English Major Students.
This course is a review of basic mathematical concepts and applications through the use of a variety of problem solving techniques which includes fundamentals of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division in problems involving whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, ratios and proportions, percentages, geometric measurements and formulas, related algebraic equations and expressions. Emphasizes is placed on analysis and solution of application problems. Non-matriculating; the credits do not count towards graduation.

MATH 095 Beginning Algebra 0.00

Prerequisite: MATH LEVEL 1 & Major<>English
This course is a review of basic mathematical concepts and applications through the use of a variety of problem-solving techniques which includes fundamentals of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division in problems involving whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, ratios and proportions, percentages, geometric measurements and formulas, related algebraic equations and expressions. Emphasis is placed on analysis and solution of application problems. Non-matriculating; the credits do not count towards graduation.

MATH 096 Intermediate Algebra 0.00

Prerequisite: (Math Level 2 or MATH 095) and Major <> English
This course is a review of algebraic concepts and applications through use of a variety of factoring techniques, graphing linear equations and inequalities, systems of equations, and an introduction of the main concepts of polynomial, rational and radical functions. Emphasis is placed on algebraic techniques in order to successfully complete MATH 111 College Algebra. Non-matriculating; the credits do not count towards graduation.

MATH 098 Precalculus 0.00

Prerequisite: (Math Lvl 3 or Math 096) & Major=Computer Science
Course topics will include polynomial functions, the binomial theorem, logarithms, exponentials, and solutions to system of equations, trignometric and inverse trignometric functions with emphasis on trignometric identities and equations.

MATH 100 Contemporary Mathematics 3.00

Prerequisite: (MATH 09# / GMPT score) & ENGL / MCM major only
This course presents methods of problem solving, centering on problems and questions which arise naturally in everyday life. Includes topics from algebra and geometry, the mathematics of finance, probability and statistics, exponential growth, and other topics chosen from traditional and contemporary mathematics which do not employ calculus.

MATH 111 College Algebra 3.00

Prerequisite: (MATH 096 / GMPT Score) & non CS Major
Course topics will include algebra and probability, polynomial functions, the binomial theorem, logarithms, exponentials, and solutions to systems of equations.

MATH 113 Precalculus 3.00

Prerequisite: (MATH 096 or Math LVL3 3) & Major=Computer Science
Course topics will include polynomial functions, the binomial theorem, logarithms, exponentials, and solutions to systems of equations, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions with emphasis on trigonometric identities and equations.

MATH 121 Basic Probability & Statistics 3.00

Prerequisite: (MATH 096 | 098 | 100) & non CS Major
This course is an introduction to probability and statistics. Topics include the concept of probability and its properties, descriptive statistics, discrete and continuous random variables, expected value, distribution functions, the central limit theorem, random sampling and sampling distributions.

MATH 122 Probability & Stats for SS 3.00

Prerequisite: (MATH 096/ GMPT score) & MCOM Major
Intended for students who are in the area of social sciences which includes mass communication. It cannot be used for general mathematics credit. Includes probability & statistics, measurement scales, the concepts of probability and its properties, descriptive statistics including frequency distributions and correlation, the normal distribution, data displays and interpretation, T test and Chi square test and analysis of variance.

MATH 130 Basic Calculus 3.00

Prerequisite: (MATH 111 / 113) & non CS Major
This is a course in the calculus of one variable intended for students who pursue a degree in business and economics, but not in computer science. It is open to others who are qualified and desire more mathematics course at the core level. Topics include a brief review of polynomials, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions, followed by discussion of limits, derivatives, applications of differential calculus to real-world problem in business and economics. An introduction to integration concludes the course.

MATH 131 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 3.00

Prerequisite: MATH098 & REQTERM>=1301 or MATH113
Provides an introduction to differential and integral calculus. Includes limits, derivatives and applications of derivatives such as related rates, Newton's method, the Mean-value Theorem, Max-Min problems, and curve sketching. Covers integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Integral Calculus, and applications of integrals, volumes, and average values.

MATH 132 Analytic Geometry & Calculus II 3.00

Prerequisite: MATH 131
Topics include conic sections, rotation of axes, polar coordinates, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse (trigonometric) functions, integration techniques, applications of the integral (including mass, moments, arc length, and hydrostatic pressure), parametric equations, infinite series, power and Taylor series.

MATH 140 Elementary Linear Algebra 3.00

Prerequisite: MATH 098 or MATH 130
Studies of linear equations and their matrix representations. Introduces the Gaussian elimination methods and determinants in matrix algebra. Reviews the geometric vectors in two and three dimensions and their linear transformations. Define vector spaces; linear independence; basis; row; column and null spaces; rank and nullity.

MATH 211 Linear Algebra 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC130 & MATH 231 & MATH 210
Topics selected from vector spaces, bases, linear transformations, matrices, canonical forms, Eigen values, hermitian and unitary matrices, inner product spaces, and quadratic forms.

MATH 221 Applied Statistics I 3.00

Prerequisite: MATH 131
This is the first course of a one-year sequence in introductory probability and statistics. It provides a comprehensive introduction to those models and methods which are most likely to be encountered by students in their careers in applied mathematics and the sciences. Topics include descriptive statistics, basics of probability theory, random variables and their distributions, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, and hypothesis testing for population means and population proportions. A student may not receive credit for MATH 121 and 221.

MATH 231 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III 3.00

Prerequisite: MATH 132
Topics include vectors, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, vector-valued functions, arc length and curvature, functions of several variables, partial and directional derivatives, gradients, extrema, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integrals, change of variables, surface area, vector fields, Stokes’ Theorem.

MATH 232 Introduction to Differential Equations 3.00

Prerequisite: MATH 132
Topics will be chosen from: linear differential equations, equations with constant coefficients, Laplace transforms, power series solutions, and systems of ordinary differential equations.

MATH 330 Advanced Calculus I 3.00

Prerequisite: CSC 130 & MATH 231
Limits, continuity, and differentiability of functions of one and several variables, sequences and series, and the Riemann Stieltjes integral.

MATH 331 Numerical Analysis I 3.00

Prerequisite: MATH 232 & CSC 125
This course provides an introduction to numerical analysis. The main topics covered include: propagation of floating point error, numerical methods for finding the zeroes of nonlinear functions and their convergence criteria, systems of linear equations (Guass elimination, LU, and Cholesky factorisation, condition number, iterative methods), interpolation and quadrature, and introduction to numerical method for systems of nonlinear equations.

MATH 342 Introduction to Abstract Algebra I 3.00

Prerequisite: (CSC 300 & MATH 231) OR CONSENT OF DEPARTMENT
Introduction to groups, rings, and fields, with emphasis on groups and rings.

MATH 400 Applied Math1 3.00

Prerequisite: MATH 232 & MATH 210
The course will cover various advanced topics in applied mathematics, and can be taken more than once for credit. Examples of such topics are: Fast transforms, digital filters, etc.

MCM 101 Media Literacy 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Use critical thinking to analyze media and news literacy such as media production, messages and delivery with relations to the audience, media industry, digital, social media, and media professions.

MCM 102 Introduction to Public Speaking. 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 / 110 / 112
This course will cover theories and techniques of organization, evidence, argumentation, persuasion, and delivery in public speaking.

MCM 103 Introduction to Mass Media 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 / 110 / 112
This course is an introduction to oral, print, and electronic media of communication. Emphasis is placed on history, theory, and criticism of the mass media as cultural institutions.

MCM 104 Introduction to Information Technology 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 / 110 / 112
This is an introduction to production and consumption of information by individuals, the work place and society. Emphasis is placed on the changing nature of communication processes as a result of the expansion of communication technologies.

MCM 105 Communication layout & design 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103
In this course, students heavily deal with different computer software to create designs and layout for various mass communication messages such as Journalism, Advertising, Public Relations, and Visual Communication. Students are taught how to create informative and persuasive messages.

MCM 107 Introduction to Cinema 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 / 110 / 112
This course presents students to the process of creating films and people involved in the process and the description of their tasks. Students are also introduced to the different types and genres of films.

MCM 121 Fundamentals of Media Broadcasting 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & UMCOM
Introduces students to theories and principles applicable to the production of audio and video content for media platforms.

MCM 141 Intro.to Public Relation/Adver 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & UMCOM
This course introduces publicity methods and public relations representation of profit and nonprofit institutions to the public; use of communication research and media, as applied to the public relations profession. The course also covers the history, rhetoric, and aesthetics of advertising. A basic understanding of industry issues and key areas such as account management, research, strategy, creative, media, and production.

MCM 201 Online PR/Advertising 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & UMCOM
This course introduces students to the use of Internet by different organizations to achieve goals for advertising and public relations purposes. Students are presented to different concepts such as online advertising/PR strategies, online advertising/PR reach, the association between online research and online advertising/PR, online targeting audience for advertising/PR and online message design.

MCM 203 Promotion, Publicity & Advertising in Broadcasting 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & UMCOM
This is an introduction to theory and practice in the planning, execution, and evaluation of persuasive campaigns involving radio and television. Emphasis is placed on concept developments and production elements. The course includes discussion of broadcast ethics.

MCM 204 Radio/TV Announcing 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & UMCOM
This course provides training in radio and television studio procedures. Production and criticism of lab programs, including news, continuity, interviews, and oral improvisation. Classroom meetings at the radio lab and the television lab, as well as lab hours, to be arranged.

MCM 205 International Communication 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & UMCOM
Students are presented to various mass communication systems of the world. Through a comparative approach, students are taught that newspapers and media outlets are treated differently and have varied statues in different parts of the world.

MCM 206 Introduction to Writing for Mass Media 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & ENGL 112 & UMCOM
Elementary principles and practice of writing for mass media in varied program formats, with emphasis on preparation of written materials for news, public relations, and public affairs.

MCM 209 Fundamentals of Advertising 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & UMCOM
Introduces the students to advertising. It covers the diverse range of advertising theories and practices and surveys the different advertising objectives including information and persuasion. Areas of focus include advertising basics, appeals, advertising history, advertising and society, advertising agencies, media planning, creativity, and advertising layout and design.

MCM 210 Introduction to Multimedia 3.00

Prerequisite: MIS 118 & PLAN=MULTIMEDIA
Introduction to Multimedia

MCM 211 Photojournalism 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & UMCOM
Take photographs of new events, sports, features and other standard newspaper and magazine events while learning basic visual and technical aspects of photojournalism such as frame composition and shutter speed.

MCM 212 Social Media Principles & Practices 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 206 & 209 & UMCOM
Prepares students to critically explore, define, and use social media in personal and professional contexts by examining their contemporary trends and tools. A hands-on-approach in lesson delivery equips students with a practical appreciation of how important forms of emerging media work.

MCM 214 Strategic Writing 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112
Draws on rhetorical theory to teach the critical skills and practical reasons for evaluating audiences, structuring an argument, and applying stylistic techniques to improve the persuasive appeal of your messages. Students will learn strategies to acheive specific communication goals in writing standard strategic messages and documents for internal and external audiences. They will get practice in writing web and e-mail messages, memos, business letters, letters to the editor, fundraising letters, press releases, brochures, and feature stories.

MCM 214 Strategic Writing 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 112
Draws on rhetorical theory to teach the critical skills and practical reasons for evaluating audiences, structuring an argument, and applying stylistic techniques to improve the persuasive appeal of your messages. Students will learn strategies to acheive specific communication goals in writing standard strategic messages and documents for internal and external audiences. They will get practice in writing web and e-mail messages, memos, business letters, letters to the editor, fundraising letters, press releases, brochures, and feature stories.

MCM 220 Design Fundametals 3.00

Prerequisite: (MIS 118 & PLAN=MULTIMEDIA) OR MCM 251
Design Fundametals

MCM 231 Radio/TV Production I 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 121 & UMCOM
Studies the basic theories and practices of radio/television studio production. Lab arranged. This course has a physical requirement requiring motor skills that allow for proper operation of radio and television equipment and the ability to exert up to 20 pounds of force on repetitive basis.

MCM 240 Applied Graphic Design 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 210 & MCM 220 & PROGRAM<>'UMCOM'
Applied Graphic Design

MCM 241 Writing for PR/ADS 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 206 & UMCOM
This course is an introduction to the process of planning, producing, and evaluating written public relations messages. Writing assignments include media releases, letters, memos, position papers, background papers, brochures, and reports and proposals.

MCM 245 Typography 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 105 & UMCOM
This course introduces the study of typography in visual communications. Emphasis upon form of letters, words, and pages; and upon the body of knowledge required for professional typographic applications. On completion, students will have developed a body of professional industry-standard works that demonstrate their awareness of contemporary design practice and their ability to work within it.

MCM 251 Introduction to Visual Communications 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 105 & UMCOM
Helps students to understand the theories of visual communications including human perception, psychology of color, and principles of design. Students learn the vocabulary of a visual language. Building upon the vocabulary, they learn how visual elements can be persuasive within a professional communication context. Covers the application of theories to graphic, design, animation, video, audio editing and web design. This course is offered every semester.

MCM 252 Graphic Design 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 251
This course will develop a working knowledge of graphic design. It includes Vector graphics creation (Adobe Illustrator, Corel Draw). The course also introduces the design of 3D computer graphics and animation. A brief history and philosophy behind this new technology via videos, graphic examples. Students will also explore the use of 3D for television and motion picture animations.

MCM 253 Visual Culture 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 251 & UMCOM
Introduces the social and historical backgrounds that inform the ever-increasing visual culture we live in. Explores the roles and influences visual representations and visual productions have on cultural experience and historical events. It draws on theories, as well as numerous historical and contemporary examples from art, design, film, video, advertising, television, new media and other forms of visual communication.

MCM 254 Visual Storytelling 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 121 & UMCOM
Provides the basic building blocks of various visual narrative techniques. The course covers photography, illustration, stroyboarding, advertising, film, comics, cartoons, audio, and documentaries. Students will learn how to evolve a simple idea into a structured story through both dynamic (moving images) and static mediums (still images).

MCM 260 Writing for Multimedia 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 251 & UMCOM
Writing for Multimedia

MCM 301 Mass media management 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 206 & UMCOM
Includes the theories of mass media management, with application to media operations. Investigates economic, legal and ethical problems and issues concerning media management.

MCM 302 Advertising Media Planning 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & Min 54 Credits
A hands-on study of how to determine an advertising budget, select media and develop a strategic plan.

MCM 303 Theory and Practice of Interviewing 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & UMCOM
The application of modern communication theory to interview situations. This theory and practicum course is designed to aid the student in mastering specific skills appropriate to specialized settings.

MCM 305 Communication campaigns 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 141 & MCM 206
Students are introduced to the principals of public relations, political, and advertising campaigns. Concepts include research, planning, message design, targeting audience and evaluation.

MCM 306 Promotion Design 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 252 & UMCOM
Explores the application of advanced graphic design and promotional techniques used in creating advertisements and other marketing collateral. The course allows the exploration of creative mediums and techniques with a focus on 3-D items and environments, such as packaging, point of sale, trade shows, exhibition spaces and concept stores.

MCM 308 Political Communication 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & Min 54 Credits
This course deals with the intersection of media and politics. The influence and sources of influence of each on the other is discussed.

MCM 309 Arab Media & Society 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 206 & UMCOM
Prepares students to explore, understand and critique the state of Arab media in both historical and contemporary contexts. Theoretical ideas such as hegemony, post-colonialism and Orientalism are introduced to situate the development of Arab media systems within the framework of the social and political conditions from which they emerged. Various media systems, forms and products are examined to highlight commonalities and distinctions across the multitude of media we classify as Arab.

MCM 311 News Writing 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 206 & UMCOM
News Writing

MCM 312 News editing 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 311
Study and practice in copy reading, headline writing, proofreading, with attention given to printing terminology, page makeup, type structure, computer use in editing, and analysis of newspapers.

MCM 313 Online journalism 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & UMCOM
Elements and practices of online journalism are introduced in this course. Students would be informed about the reasons inviting newspapers to go online and the benefits and drawbacks of this type of publication. Students would be familiarized about the main differences between the traditional newspaper publication and online newspaper publication. Elements of designing interactive media messages are highlighted.

MCM 320 Multimedia Ethics 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 251 & UMCOM
Multimedia Ethics

MCM 321 In-depth reporting 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 311
Rigorous, in-depth instruction and critiques of students' news and investigative reporting assignments done with different reporting methodologies: interviewing, official records, direct and participant observation, and survey research.

MCM 322 Feature & Magazine Writing 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 311
Instruction and practice in writing feature articles for newspapers and magazines.

MCM 331 Radio/TV Production II 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 231
Studies the advanced theories and practices of radio and television production. Explores higher level television skills and principles from those in MCM 231. Lab arranged. This course has a physical requirement requiring motor skills that allow for proper operation of radio and television equipment and the ability to exert upto 20 pounds of force on a repetitive basis.

MCM 332 Electronic News Gathering & Field Production 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 121 & UMCOM
Studies the basic skills necessary to provide news packages for broadcast. Students gain knowledge on story development and production skills needed to write, interview, report, shoot and edit audio and video news stories.

MCM 340 Web Interface Design 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 210 & PLAN=MULTIMEDIA
Web Interface Design

MCM 341 Cases in PR/Advertising 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 141 & UMCOM
Students are presented to real cases of successful and unsuccessful advertising and public relations projects and tasks that allow students to critically think of the process of conducting these projects and what they need to avoid.

MCM 351 Studio Production I 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 253 & PLAN <> MULTIMEDIA
This course is a study of the application of digital audio and video tools. It focuses on the issues and production techniques involved in creating and editing digital audio and video. Codec’s, architectures, editing techniques and project-planning concerns are the key topics covered. Techniques of streaming audio and video may also be covered.

MCM 352 Web Design 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 251
This course will explore issues in the making of digital video and Digital sound. It is designed around Adobe After Effects and Adobe Premiere. The course presents solutions for problems involved in digitizing from video tape, Audi CD and other sources.

MCM 353 Motion Graphics 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 251 & UMCOM
Introduces students to the principles and elements of motion design. It identifies methods and process for conceptualizing in time-based media, as well as developing a vocabulary and visual language for motion. In addition to stressing systems, structure and synthesis of text and image for time-based media, the course also provides knowledge and skills in the digital creativity, such as 2D and 3D animation.

MCM 354 Studio Production II 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 351
This course is the highest level of advanced digital audio and video editing. Students explore video language while producing a more ambitious work through improved technical skills, including digital modes of post-production. It integrates hands-on demonstrations, lecture, exercises, projects and critiques. Students use digital video cameras along with high end software to produce a final project.

MCM 355 3D Animation 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 251
Through the process of learning to assemble the components necessary to allow for efficient workflow in getting animated storytelling on the screen, students in this course focus on 3D modeling, texturing, animating, lighting and rendering, and assembling shots in sequence to create effective storytelling.

MCM 360 Multimedia Authoring 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 210 & PLAN=MULTIMEDIA
Multimedia Authoring

MCM 380 Advanced Audio/Video Production 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 254 & UMCOM
Provides students with hands-on training in the sequence of digital media production. Includes training on pre-production and planning, audio and video capture, and post-production and editing.

MCM 400 Internship in Multimedia 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 210 & PLAN=MULTIMEDIA
Internship in Multimedia

MCM 401 History of Mass Communication 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & UMCOM
Examination of the social, economic, and political factors contributing to the development of American mass media. Emphasis on significant personalities who helped shape its course; analysis of select critical works.

MCM 402 Mass Media Criticism 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & Min 54 Credits
The study of media content and its effect on society. Reading and viewing of selected works. Independent reading and critical analysis required.

MCM 403 Public Opinion 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 103 & Min 54 Credits
An important element in any communication process is considering the people who receive the communication messages. People reaction is studied in this course as well as concepts such as targeting audience, active and passive reactions.

MCM 405 Special Topics in Visual Communication 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 251 & Pass Credits>=54 & Program<>MULTIMEDIA
Special Topics in Visual Communication

MCM 410 Principles of Educational Multimedia 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 251 & UMCOM
Principles of Educational Multimedia

MCM 411 Media Law & Ethics 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 206 & Junior Standing & UMCOM
Discussion of laws and ethics affecting the mass media. Exploration of problems and issues in legal regulation of media content, ownership and ethical standards such as privacy, censorship, honesty, fairness, and objectivity.

MCM 412 Communication Theory 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 206 & 54 Passed Credit & UMCOM
Survey of elements and processes critical to human communication behavior. Comparison of influential communication theories.

MCM 413 Research Methods in Mass Communication 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 206 & MATH (111 / 122) & Junior Level & UMCOM
Introduction to the fundamental tools of quantitative research in communication. Focus of the course is on reading and comprehending communication research reports rather than conducting quantitative research.

MCM 422 Internship in journalism 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 312 & MCM 321 & MCM 322
Practical work with an off-campus newspaper, magazine, or other news organization, supervised by a journalism professional in consultation with a faculty member. Repeatable, but no more than six hours total credit may be earned in internship courses toward the 36-hour minimum required for the degree.

MCM 431 Internship in Radio/ TV 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 332
Practical work at an off-campus radio/TV station, supervised by a professional in consultation with a faculty member. Repeatable, but no more than six hours total credit may be earned in internship courses toward the 36-hour minimum required for the degree.

MCM 432 Senior Project in Radio/TV 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 332 & Junior Level
Enables students to develop creative works such as audio and/or video projects as part of their professional training. The course should be conducted under the mentorship of industry professionals in coordination with the course instructor.

MCM 439 Senior Project 3.00

Prerequisite: Senior Standing
Senior Project

MCM 440 Digital Portfolio Production 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 360 & PLAN=MULTIMEDIA
Digital Portfolio Production

MCM 441 Integrated Marketing Communication. 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 141 & Junior Standing & UMCOM
This course presents students to a combining approach gathering elements and ideas from marketing and communication as a method to achieve organizational goals. Students learn that organizations mix public relations, advertising, marketing, personal communication and others, can increase their advantages. Students are presented to IMC components, planning, and message design.

MCM 442 Internship in PR/Advertising 3.00

Prerequisite: (MCM241 & MCM 341 & MCM 441 & PLAN=PR/ADV) OR (MCM 341 & MCM 441)
Advanced practical work in business communication, political campaign communication, advertising, public relations, or other forms of organizational or public communication. Work must be done off campus, under supervision of a working professional in the field, in consultation with a faculty member. Repeatable, but no more than six hours total credit may be earned in internship courses toward the 36-hour minimum required for the degree.

MCM 443 Senior Project in PR/Advertising 3.00

Prerequisite: (MCM241 & MCM 341 & MCM 441 & PLAN=PR/ADV) OR (MCM 341 & MCM 441)
In this course, students are required to create their own projects in PR/Advertising. The aim of this course is to enable students to create creative works as part of personal portfolios presented to others upon seeking a job.

MCM 451 Advanced Animation 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 355 or (MCM 360 & plan=MULTIMEDIA)
Focusing on character rigging and animation, expressive timing, staging and fluid movement in character animation, students create original, high quality animated segments in preparation for senior projects and portfolio quality work. Additional advanced techniques are taught such as facial expression and lip-synch.

MCM 452 Internship in Visual Communication 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 252 & MCM 253 & MCM 352 & MCM353 & PROG<>MULTIMEDIA
This subject provides students with an opportunity to undertake professional attachment to an onsite multimedia/graphic project. Students will also produce a seminar paper documenting and evaluating their professional attachment.

MCM 453 Senior Project in Visual Communication 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 252 & MCM 253 & MCM 352 & MCM353 & PROG<>MULTIMEDIA
Working in small production teams, students in this course learn how to manage the production pipeline for a visual communication project. With the focus on working in a team environment to meet deadlines, students are expected to produce a professional quality projects in the areas of to graphic design, animation, video and audio editing, or web design. Students are encouraged to develop an individual approach that defines them as independent, creative and intelligent thinkers ready to challenge and contribute to a contemporary visual communication environment.

MCM 455 Internship 3.00

Prerequisite: Junior Standing & UMCOM
Professional attachment to an onsite professional media organization. Requires students to officially document work and hous performed.

MCM 460 Advanced Multimedia 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 251 & UMCOM
Advanced Multimedia

MCM 480 Topics in Multimedia 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 210 & PLAN=MULTIMEDIA
Topics in Multimedia

MCM 495 Special topics in mass communication 3.00

Prerequisite: MCM 206 & 54 Passed Credit & UMCOM
Based on faculty’s selection of topics, students are presented to a certain topic focusing on mass communication.

MUSC 109 World Music 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
The music of Africa, Asia, and Oceania; a survey of the tribal, folk, classical and performing arts of these cultures. The course will highlight the influence of Buddhism, Islam, and Western acculturation on the functions of music in these societies.

MUSC 110 Introduction to Music 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
This course studies the structural elements and terms of Western music. It includes an awareness of the orchestral instruments and voices used in performance. This foundation then focuses on the history of Western musical styles and forms from the Middle Ages to the present day.

MUSC 111 Class Voice 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Studies the essentials of Western vocal technique. Involves group singing and solo presentations in class with practical comments and guidance for improvement. Includes training in elementary solfege and sight-singing as well as listening to recorded examples of fine singing from the present and past.

MUSC 121 University Chorus 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Brings together students in a four-part, applied choral experience. Draws upon repertoire from a broad range of multi-cultural, historical, and contemporary styles. Elements of vocal technique will be presented and applied towards choral success. Study of the semester's choral compositions will culminate in performances on campus throughout the academic year, with the added possibility of representing GUST to the outside public.

MUSC 122 University Chorus II 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Brings together students in a four-part, applied choral experience. Draws upon repertoire from a broad range of multi-cultural, historical, and contemporary styles. Elements of vocal technique will be presented and applied towards choral success. Study of the semester's choral compositions will culminate in performances on campus throughout the academic year, with the added possibility of representing GUST to the outside public.

PHED 101 Introduction to Physical Education 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
This course is designed to provide an overview of physical activity and lifetime personal fitness. The course introduces different components of fitness, different types of aerobic/anaerobic exercises, flexibility and body composition, muscular strength and endurance and management of personal fitness and nutrition. The course covers a variety of lifetime activities that promote health and well-being.

PHIL 110 Thinking Skills 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Provides methods how to engage in reflective and independent thinking. Enables students to detect underlying issues in texts and to evaluate problems autonomously; to analyze the logical structure to texts; to define and express terms and thoughts properly and precisely; to analyze and evaluate evidences; to think clearly and systematically and to express ideas; to understand the logical connections between ideas and to identify, construct and evaluate arguments.

PHIL 115 Major Questions in Philosophy 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Discusses representative topics in philosophy such as free will and determinism, mind and body, the basis of moral judgements, knowledge and belief, the existence of God and evil, and the pssibility of constructing a world view.

PHIL 125 Islamic Philosophy 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Considers philosophical and theological background and examines the thought of such notable Islamic philosophers as al-Kindi, Ibn Sina, al-Ghazali, and Ibn Rushd (from the mid-9th through 12th centuries). Topics include proofs of existence of God, whether the world is eternal or had a beginning, the nature of the soul and whether it is immortal, and distinction between essence and existence. The course is taugh in English.

PHIL 143 Approaches to Ethics 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Approaches to Ethics

PHIL 185 Philosophy of Religions 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Investigates and reflects on some of the main issues in religion such as: the nature and relationship between faith and reason, religion pluralism, the existence of God, the nature of God, the problem of evil, the relationship between God and ethics, life after death, and the meaning of life.

PHIL 190 Philosophy of Art 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Provides a general insight into the most fundamental principles of the philosophical discipline of aesthetics. Covers questions such as: What is design? What is style? What is fashion? What does it mean to be "Cool"? What have philosophers said about all this during the last 2000 years? Is everything merely a matter of tast? Is there a relationship between aesthetic and ethics? Can something be bad and beautiful at the same time? Can art be useful?

PHIL 245 Ethics and the Computer 3.00

Prerequisite: combined 6 credits from MATH, CSC or PHIL
Introduction to ethics theory and ethical decision making within the computing profession context. Topics include local and global impact of computing solutions, intellectual property, privacy, network security, electronic crimes and computer reliability.

PHYS 100 How Things Work 3.00

Prerequisite: (CS Term<1201 or any other program) & (English Level 3 and above)
This is an introductory course for students in non-science majors presenting physical principles and laws through examples from everyday life experiences. Topics covered include inertia, speed and velocity, acceleration, Newton’s laws, projectile motion, rotational motion, work and energy, friction, conservation laws, equilibrium, Hooke’s law, fluids and their motion, heat and thermodynamics, mechanical waves and resonance.

PHYS 101 Ideas in Modern Physics 3.00

Prerequisite: PHYS 100
Introduces concepts of modern physics such as relativity, quantum mechanics in addition to atomic and nuclear physics. Builds up awareness about the energy future of our planet.

PHYS 110 Basic Physics I 3.00

Prerequisite: MATH 098/113 (CS students from 1201 must enroll in corresponding Lab PHYS 110L)
This is an algebra-based survey course intended for students in health and life sciences covering such topics as kinematics, Newton’s laws, rotational motion, work and energy, linear momentum, conservation laws, static equilibrium and fluids.

PHYS 110L Basic Physics Lab 1.00

Prerequisite: PHYS 110 coreq
A course designed to provide students with Laboratory experience and to support the fundamental knowledge in classical mechanics and heat. Two hours of laboratory per week are required. It is recommended to take this course along with PHYS 110

POLI 101 Introduction to Politics 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Provides an overview of how politics and political systems in different countries work. Links analytical concepts, theories and methods in politics to the realities of the political world. Covers topics like power, political ideologies, states, rights, and regimes, political culture, public opinion, interest groups, elections, political institutions and violence.

POLI 131 Politics of Kuwait 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
This course presents survey of political systems and governments and explores Kuwait's history and politics. It provides an overview of its major political institutions and groups that shape current events. Particular attention is paid to the influence of interest groups and key political institutions and actors. Students will examine the context of Kuwait's political culture, political economy, and international political influence.

POLI 190 Universal Human Rights: Ideals & Realities 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Aims to defend the position that human rights are universal rights by unpacking the concept of universal human rights: it is historical beginnings, its possible religious and cultural influences and conflicts, and the ongoing contentions that surround it. Addresses ongoing local, regional, and global rights issues and violations and discusses the transformative power of education for human rights. This course equips students with the knowledge, skills, and values necessary to contribute to the worldwide human rights dialogue.

POLI 210 International Relations 3.00

Prerequisite: Any POLI course
Surveys the key concepts, theories, actors, issues, and processes in world politics. Analyzes the linkages between theories and complex realities in world, the impacts of globalization, war, information technology revolution, transnational actors and regimes, international law and organizations on international relations.

POLI 250 Comparative Politics 3.00

Prerequisite: POLI 101
Examines the similarities and differences in the basic political ideologies, structures, economies, social institutions and governmental processes of developed and developing countries, use case studies from North America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America to enhance students' understanding of comparative politics and political system.

POLI 252 Middle Eastern Politics 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Middle Eastern Politics

PSYC 100 Academic Success 3.00

Prerequisite: (ENGL 098 | 100) & Level=Freshman & GPA<2
This course focuses on perparing the student to be successful in a higher-education environment, specifically the Gulf University for Science & Technology environment. Through a combination of brief lectures, followed by pair/group work, and indvidual reflection activities, as well as through on-campus investigative activities, the student will be presented with real-university-life concepts and situations and then assigned tasks requiring application and exercise of critical-thinking and problem solving skills. Under the close supervision of the instructor and using the workshop method in tandem with current blended learning practices, the student will investigate issues, concepts and skills that provide a solid foundation for smooth integration into university life. Capstone project is required. Successful completion of this course will prepare students for sommoth entry into the world of higher education and will counter behaviours that have set them on a non-productive path.

PSYC 100 Academic Success 3.00

Prerequisite: (ENGL 098 | 100) & Level=Freshman & GPA<2
This course focuses on perparing the student to be successful in a higher-education environment, specifically the Gulf University for Science & Technology environment. Through a combination of brief lectures, followed by pair/group work, and indvidual reflection activities, as well as through on-campus investigative activities, the student will be presented with real-university-life concepts and situations and then assigned tasks requiring application and exercise of critical-thinking and problem solving skills. Under the close supervision of the instructor and using the workshop method in tandem with current blended learning practices, the student will investigate issues, concepts and skills that provide a solid foundation for smooth integration into university life. Capstone project is required. Successful completion of this course will prepare students for sommoth entry into the world of higher education and will counter behaviours that have set them on a non-productive path.

PSYC 103 General Psychology 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Introduces the general principles of psychology and human behavior. Topics include: development, basic principles of learning, memory, intelligence, motivation, emotions, personality theories, abnormal behavior, health and social influence. New trends in psychology are also presented.

PSYC 216 Social Psychology 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Studies interaction between indviduals and their social environment. Topics include: the social self, person perception and impression formation, attribution and confirmation biases, stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination, attitudes, conformity, group processes, close relationships, helping others, agreesion and health.

PSYC 221 Psychology of Personality 3.00

Prerequisite: Any PSYC course
Promotes an understanding of the different perspectives in psychology of persoanlity and synthesizes them within a framework of what personality is and how it functions. Answers why do we behave the way we do across contexts and situations? How are we different from others? Theories examined are: psychodynamic, trait, cognitive, behavioral/ learning, biological and phenomenological/ existential.

PSYC 223 Cross-Cultural Psychology 3.00

Prerequisite: PSYC 103
Studies the coming together of culture and psychology. Seeks to explain the role of culture in shaping human development and psychological processes. Foci include the three main approaches to understanding how culture affects human psychological development: cross-cultural psychology, and indigenous psychology.

PSYC 224 Political Psychology 3.00

Prerequisite: PSYC 103
Use psychological theories and concepts to describe and explain various political phenomena. It applies disciplinary knowledge to real-world problems and situations in order to shed light on the mysteries of what drives individual actors or groups to think, feel, and behave in particular ways in a political context.

SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions and draws upon the main sociological theories and concepts, supported by relevant empirical research. Students will explore social, political, and economic phenomena in terms of social structures, social forces, and group relations through analyzing important sociological topics, including socialization, culture, the social construction of knowledge, inequality, race and ethnic relations, poverty, political sociology.

SOC 120 Gender Roles in Society 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Introduces students to the sociological analysis of gender roles in mainstream society, with specific focus on the social constructional approach to gender in the social institutions of family, work, education and politics, Theories of Biology and Psychology will be compared to Sociological theories to explore the nature and nurture debates on gender roles, as will research on feminism and masculinities. The relationship between gender roles and social inequality and individual and social consequences of changing gender roles in contemporary society will be explored.

SOC 140 Social Problems 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Examines social problems, their causes and consequences, within a local and global context. Main sociological perspectives are applied to provide an understanding of important social and problems including poverty and wealth, gender inequality, crime and criminal justice, violence, work and the workplace, divorce, and family life. Potential solutions to these problems are evaluated and students are encouraged to explore how their individual lives are connected with larger social realities.

SOC 150 Food & Globalization 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 100
Provides an introduction into globalization through the prism of agro-food relations. It will explore global structures of production and transportation of common food items from source to your plate, and how these structures relate to human oppression and liberation, health and dignity, and sustainibility of life in our interconnected world.

SOC 204 Criminology 3.00

Prerequisite: Any course in SOC
Explores the key concepts and theoretical approaches to criminology and criminal justice. It combines core criminological theory with justice, focusing on relations between the police and the public, and the role of imprisonment, including notions of justice and the social effects of the use of imprisonment. It considers social diversity, inequality, deviance, and crime control while examining the nature of social relationship between individuals, groups and institutions of criminal justice.

SOC 205 Urban Sociology 3.00

Prerequisite: SOC ###
Investigates the devlopment and functions of cities from a sociological perspective, exploring explaination of uraban growth and change and the consequences of social change for neighbourhoods and cities. Beginning with a history of urbanization, the course considers central theories of urban sociology including ecological, political/ economic, cultural, and experimental perspectives. Contemporary research is used to examine how individuals, social interactions, and institution shape, and are shaped by, characteristics of urban space. Topics explored include poverty, race and ethnicity, residential degradation, housing, crime, and victimization, health, social isolation, culture and global cities.

SOC 271 Society in Information Age 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 100 & Any SOC ###
Investigates the development and charasterics of technology based societies. Students explore how modern technology is shaping social relationships and what type of individual and social charasterics are encourage by the demand of the Information Age and what advanced technological development level of society mean for governance and democracy.

SOC 300 Special Topics in Sociology 3.00

Prerequisite: Any SOC 200 Level Course
Uses conceptual and applied social science skills to explore selected topics, such as economic sociology, environment sociology, development sociology, and sociology of family. The course will introduce key concepts and debates on the selected topic, and discuss their practical application. Students will be required to connect learned material to a region and subtopic of their choice with independent research.

SOC 301 Population, Society & Development in the GCC 3.00

Prerequisite: Any course in SOC, POLI, HIST
Population, Society & Development in the GCC

SPAN 101 Spanish I 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 098 / 100/ 110/ 112
Prepares students to apply the basic skills of communicaiton: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasizes fluency in the language through a communicative approach. Outlines basic vocabulary building and essential grammatical structures of the language.

SPAN 102 Spanish II 3.00

Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or SPAN 121 or placement test
Expands the knowledge of the Spanish language by further developing the basic skills of communication: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Emphasizes fluency in the language through a communicative approach. Advances the use of the Spanish in the classroom.

SPAN 122 THE LUSO-HISPANIC WORLD 3.00

Prerequisite: ENGL 110 / 112
Provides an introductory perspective on the issues and topics that shape the Luso-Hispanic World. Introduces the most relevant historical periods based on a transatlantic approach. Examines foundational writings in relation to the cultural challenges in the region. Traces contemporary debates at national and global level. Conducted in English.

SPAN 270 Spanish Conversation & Pronunciation 3.00

Prerequisite: SPAN 101
Develops students' ability to speak and understand Spanish in both conversational and formal contexts. It focuses on active communication skills while working on spontaneous conversations related to topics of daily life. Activities include oral presentations, collaborative projects, language journals, and other multimedia documents.

SPAN 380 Readings in Spanish 3.00

Prerequisite: GEPT / TOEFL Score / ENGL 110
Provides students with an overview of Spanish-language literature through a critical study of representative short to medium-length texts in translation. The course complements the Spanish language and culture courses available and also aims to familiarize students with genres and key critical concepts with the Spanish literary tradition. The course is conducted in English.

THTR 121 Fundamentals of Acting 3.00

Prerequisite: (ENGL 100 or ENGL 110 or ENGL 112) as co/pre-requisite
This course is an introduction to the study and practice of acting. It will consider acting from a number of perspectives: the nature of acting, the process of acting, and the relationship between dramatic texts and their performers. Analyzing and building a character, diverse acting styles, realistic and nonrealistic acting and acting for stage, television and cinema will be discussed and practiced.

THTR 180 Introduction to Theatre 3.00

Prerequisite: (ENGL 100 or ENGL 110 or ENGL 112) as co/pre-requisite
This course is an introduction to the study of theatre and drama arts. The course will cover theatre and drama from a number of perspectives: the nature of theatre as a performing art, connection between ritual and theatre, relationship of theatre to life, language and literature, stage, acting directing and playwriting. The course covers the history of drama and theatre, the beginnings (ritual drama and Greek drama), the medieval theatre, the renaissance and the 17th-20th centuries.